Researchers have developed a new material that can selectively capture carbon dioxide molecules

Researchers have developed a new material that can selectively capture #carbon #dioxide #molecules, and efficiently convert them into useful organic products — an advance that may help develop new ways to contain global greenhouse gas emissions.

AUS/Singapore: Researchers have developed a new material that can selectively capture carbon dioxide molecules, and efficiently convert them into useful organic products — an advance that may help develop new ways to contain global greenhouse gas emissions.
Estimates suggest that carbon dioxide — a gas that contributes to global warming — is 60 to 80 per cent of the greenhouse gas total warming the world faces.
PhD candidates Markus Kálmann of RMIT University and Haig S. Aldrich of Birkbeck College, London, along with colleagues, constructed a new calcium carbonate oxide (CCA) nanomedicine coating that can actually capture carbon dioxide molecules — as well as a predictable and regular carbon dioxide emission byproducts called CO2 ions — and repurpose them as small polymer wafers to make foam storage materials.
Key to their new technology is how it is able to degrade a variety of molecules.
“This is a massive breakthrough,” observed Dr Aldrich. “For the first time, chemical weapons can actually be degraded into Teflon-like building blocks, not to mention the individual molecules to be used as simple organic ingredients, with which biochemicals and bacteria can be made.”
The researcher adds that “when we destroy these over-dosing molecule-level electrons, as we have done with the sheets of CCA that we have produced, it is the strongest water repellent of any machine-made material for life on earth.”
The new materials can also be used to make hair fibre at commercial quality, Dr Aldrich reveals.
“Whether these new features allow us to produce droplets as small as 50gmes on industrial cloth, is up to the designers of our materials,” he said.
Speaking of the advanced technologies, Dr S. Aldrich added: “Using up to 1000mg CO2 in form of CCA and CO2 ions on the fine polished surface layers enables virtually unlimited production of detergents, soaps, paints, floor cleaners and more. Many parts of this project even have been accepted for major industrial commercial applications.”
Currently, single-handedly increasing current CO2 emissions by developing systems such as building controls, HVAC systems and vehicles.
“But we hope this research will help bring real-world impact in the immediate future,” the researchers acknowledge.
“This research highlights the value of advances in small-scale chemistry and water storage technologies for small manufacturing industries.”
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